Archive for December, 2014

The Realities of a Career in Law

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

My last post passed on a “gentle rebuke” from a federal judge that included a video by Scott Greenfield. Today the judge had a new post with a link to an article by Greenfield that elaborates on the point. Greenfield states, “”The primary enablers are academics, who have given away their classrooms to their special little snowflakes.” My undergrads seem to have little problem coping with the studying the realities of life that legal professionals must confront as part of their career. Maybe it’s just that their lives have contained more of those realities than those of students at high end law school?”

What do you practicing paralegals think? Does Greenfield have a point, do the students have the better point, or is the answer somewhere in between?

Here’s a link to Greenfield’s article.

A Judge’s Gentle Rebuke

Friday, December 12th, 2014

The judge in question is a federal district court judge whose blog is entitled, “Hercules and the Umpire.” His rebuke was directed at Columbia University law students. The point made by the judge and by Scott Greenfield in the video at the end of the judge’s post is also applicable to paralegals. Law and paralegal students should take the time to read the post and watch the video. Practicing paralegals will appreciate the points made in both and likely recall instances where they had to set aside personal trauma and do their job. The judge starts:

Dear Columbia Law Students,

I mean this in the kindest way possible: If you postponed your exams because the Garner and Brown cases “traumatized” your psyche, there is a distinct possibility that you are unfit to practice law. If you are one of those who claimed “trauma,” and you still want to practice law, you must toughen up before you agree to take on a client. The practice of law is not about you.

The reset, including Greenfield’s video is here. You can go directly to the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FW8D8xIiKBw#t=61

More on Supervision and Embezzlement

Thursday, December 11th, 2014

In the past when reporting on alleged paralegal embezzlement, I’ve harped on the fact that the paralegal’s attorney has a problem due to having provided inadequate supervision of the paralegal, a duty owed to both the public and the paralegal. Today’s ABAJournal.com feed has a post that supports my thoughts on the topic, although it involves an “office manager” rather than a paralegal. The problem was discovered when a client went to another attorney who discovered that her personal injury case had already been settled. Apparently the office manager had negotiated a settlement and run off with the funds (and her office computer containing records of client settlements.) The Kansas Supreme Court suspended the attorney for three months stating, ““The facts are clear and convincing that respondent did not properly supervise his office manager, he failed to keep a master list of clients, and he failed to keep proper accounting records. ”

Governor Proclamations

Friday, December 5th, 2014

Reading through the first issues of Legal Assistant Today, I find that in 1983 the governor of New Jersey proclaimed the entire month of May as “Legal Assistant” month. This is significant because it comes only 16 years after the ABA first started recognizing the role of legal assistants and is less than ten years after the formation of NALA and NFPA. Are any of you aware of an earlier proclamation by a governor?