Posts Tagged ‘ethical misconduct’

Handling Unethical Attorney Conduct: An Example

Monday, December 13th, 2010

From time to time I’ve done posts here on the dilemma paralegals face when working for an attorney who is engaged in unethical conduct. Often a certain amount of judgment is required as to whether the conduct requires the paralegal to report the conduct. I write about this in The Empowered Paralegal: Effective, Efficient, and Professional. There I emphasize,

If you do decide to report, I do suggest obtaining legal advice first from an attorney outside of the one in which you work. Remember that attorney has a firm obligation to keep what you tell her confidential. That attorney can advise you regarding protections to which you may be entitled, the proper authority to which you should report and the correct procedures for reporting. Generally, you will receive immunity from being sued by your employer for slander and libel, and you may be entitled to certain protections against on-the-job retaliation under “Whistleblower” laws. She will help you analyze the situation to determine whether you have the necessary facts, have properly interpreted the facts and validate your decision regarding the proper balancing of interest and integrity.

In fact a paralegal is well advised to seek independent legal advice from an outside attorney in determining whether to report.

I write about this again now because of a proceeding brought against six attorneys in Maine by the  Board of  Bar Overseers. Having practiced in Maine for over thirty years, I am familiar with many of the player in this drama, but the reason I am writing about it here is that the matter involved the theft of $300,000 from an elderly client (of particular interest to me because of the recent publication of The Empowered Paralegal: Working with the Elder Client, wherein I discuss such dangers) which theft was discovered by the attorney’s legal secretary who may very well have been a full paralegal.

The attorney (a member of one of the largest and most prominent firms in Maine) who stole the money has been disbarred for life and served two years in federal prison. The present proceeding is against six members of the firm’s executive board. The Board of  Bar Overseers is alleging they failed to properly supervised and report with regard to the incident. The full story is reported in the Portland Press Herald here and here. However, this is the allegation most pertinent to this post:

According to Davis [Bar Counsel representing the  Board of Bar Overseers – Hi, Scott!], Warren should have begun a thorough investigation of Duncan’s billing practices immediately after his legal secretary came forward with concerns about suspicious checks. Instead, Davis alleges, Warren accepted a false explanation from Duncan and told secretary Ellie Rommel not to seek legal advice from her private attorney.

If Rommel had listened to that advice, Davis alleges, “Duncan’s misconduct would have remained hidden, covered up and never properly reported by any of the firm’s board members as they were required to do.”

But Rommel continued to blow the whistle and consulted with attorney Daniel Lilley, whose interaction with Verrill Dana forced the firm to bring in outside auditors, Davis wrote.

Hence my modification of my original advice: a paralegal in this position should consult an outside attorney not only if they decide to report, but in determining whether a report should be made. This case, whether or not the allegation is true, demonstrates the folly of seeking that advice within the firm.

Paralegal Whistleblower

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009

By now most of you likely know the story of Tamarah Grimes, a Justice Department paralegal, who according to Andrew Kreig, 

has repeatedly stepped forward to allege misconduct by her colleagues on the Siegelman prosecution team. Grimes, a Republican paralegal with a quarter century experience in legal support, began alleging years ago that the Republican U.S. Attorney Leura Canary remained active in overseeing Siegelman’s prosecution despite Canary’s public claims that she was recused from the case since 2002 because of her husband’s longtime opposition to Siegelman, Alabama’s top Democrat.

The paralegal was fired in June and cut off from health benefits a week after writing a 10-page letter to Attorney Gen. Eric Holder documenting the problems, as I reported for Huffington Post July and at greater length this month for the national paralegal magazine Know.

This is a remarkable story on several levels and, if the facts are as stated, Tamarah is a remarkable person and paralegal. This blog has discussed the difficulties of working for a dishonest attorney in several posts. Tamarah and her story should be read and seriously considered by every paralegal. So, if you have not already read the article in Know, please click the link above and do so now.