Posts Tagged ‘Practical Paralegalism’

Comfortable, Professional Shoes

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

I am sure most of you already know that Lynne at Practical Paralegalism has a long running feature on Paralegal Career Dressing. It is very well done. (Despite my tendency to read the titles as “Paralegal Cross Dressing” when feeling the effects of my medication.) I now note that Vicki, The Paralegal Mentor has provided a link to a posting at lawyerist.com entitled, “Dress for Success: The 5 Shoes Every Woman Should Own.”

I am all for this coverage of this topic. I deal with the need to dress professionally in The Empowered Paralegal: Effective, Efficient, and Professional,” and have posted about it on this blog. But the example I use in the book relates to So, my question today echos that asked by Melissa H. long ago: Where are all the men? Of course, as Melissa points out, there are fewer men in the profession and few (if any) paralegal bloggers, but those in the profession do need to know how to dress professionally and fashionably. Lynne, perhaps you could throw a shirt, tie, and slacks on that bony friend of your and give some hints to the guys. Oh, and some comfortable, professional shoes!

Another Problem with Social Networks – Not Using Them Enough!

Wednesday, August 17th, 2011

Through posts from Patti’s Paralegal Page and Lawyerist.comI read “Ethical Bounds of Using Evidence From Social Networks” at Law.com. While much of the article covers well-tred ground (especially by Lynne DeVenny of Practical Paralegalism. But this article by H. Christopher Boehning and Daniel J. Toal includes analysis of  a recent article published in the Delaware Law Review, in which attorney Margaret DiBianca ” identified a number of these novel ethical issues.” In essence the article points out that given the prevalence of social networking, it may be a violation of an attorney’s ethical obligations of competent representation, diligent representation, and preservation of evidence not to become of aware of evidence available on social network sites for all parties to litigation. For example, they point out, ”

Preservation of evidence. Under Rule 3.4 (a) (1) of New York’s Code of Professional Conduct, a lawyer may “not suppress any evidence that the lawyer or the client has an obligation to reveal or produce.” The duty to preserve relevant evidence — including “computerized information” — attaches upon the reasonable foreseeability of litigation.

Upon learning that a client’s social networking site contains information that is potentially harmful to a claim or defense, a lawyer may be tempted to advise the client to remove the harmful content.[FOOTNOTE 12] To do so, however, would risk running afoul of Rule 3.4 (a), and incurring sanctions for spoliation of evidence.[FOOTNOTE 13]

A lawyer cannot, however, attempt to preserve that which he does not know exists. This is yet another reason why lawyers should familiarize themselves with clients’ online activities — to ensure compliance with the rules of discovery.

Since checking the internet for possible evidence is typically a paralegal’s job, take a moment to click through and read the entire article. Then make an addition to your case startup checklist!

Not Doing Nothing -The Paralegal Voice on Ethics and Professionalism.

Monday, June 13th, 2011

It’s been awhile, I know. But I’ve not been doing nothing. Two children graduated (one in Providence and one from grad school at NYU – both summa!). So we drove from Mississippi to Providence, then to NYC, then back to Providence, then up to Maine where I’ve been holed up in a cottage re-charging while indexing and doing final edits on The Empowered Paralegal Professionalism Anthology, editing a student’s Masters thesis, conducting an online course, working on The Empowered Paralegal Cause of Action Handbook,etc. What I have not been doing (obviously) is posting here. However, with the Anthology behind me, I’m likely to get back to regular posting.

In the meantime there are a whole lot of people who really have not been doing nothing and I’m just catching up with what they’ve been doing. As usual Vicki Voisin, The Paralegal Mentor, and Lynne Devenny of Practical Paralegalism top the “active” list with blog posts, newletters, speaking engagement, etc. However, the item you should catch if you haven’t already, is the latest edition of their The Paralegal Voice:

Ethics and professionalism are essential to becoming a successful paralegal. On this edition of The Paralegal Voice, co-hosts Lynne DeVenny and Vicki Voisin welcome paralegal, Camille Stell, Director of Client Services for Lawyers Mutual, who provides ethics tips for paralegals, talks about how paralegals can assist attorneys in the area of client communications and what paralegals can do every day to maintain the highest level of professionalism.

This is an important topic and Lynne and Vicki handle it well!